COVID-19 News and Updates – The Impact of Smoking & Vaping

 

 

Smoking Facts in New Mexico and the US

 

CDC Data on Blacks and Tobacco = https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/disparities/african-americans/index.htm

There were over 40 million African Americans in the United States in 2016—approximately 13% of the U.S. population.Although African Americans usually smoke fewer cigarettes and start smoking cigarettes at an older age, they are more likely to die from smoking-related diseases than Whites.

African American children and adults are more likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke than any other racial or ethnic group.

  • During 2013-2014, secondhand smoke exposure was found in:
    • 66.1% of African American children aged 3–11 years.
    • 55.3% of African American adolescents aged 12–19 years.
    • 45.5% of African American adults aged 20 years and older.
  • African American nonsmokers generally have higher cotinine levels (an indicator of recent exposure to tobacco smoke) than nonsmokers of other races/ethnicities.

NEW MEXICO DATA

  1. New Mexico Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System(BRFSS) 2018 Annual Report = https://nmhealth.org/data/view/behavior/2365/
  2. Approximate number of Blacks/African Americans in NM who smoke is 15.5% 
  3. In 2018, 15.2% of New Mexico adults were current smokers. This was lower than the U.S. median prevalence (16.1%).
  4. Males (17.3%) reported a significantly higher prevalence of current smoking than females (13.2%).
  5. Tobacco & New Mexico’s Indicator-Based Information System (NM-IBIS) = https://ibis.health.state.nm.us/topic/risk_resiliency/behaviors/Tobacco.html
  6. The prevalence of current cigarette smoking among New Mexico and U.S. high school youth has decreased dramatically in the past decade, New Mexico’s youth cigarette smoking rate in 2017 (10.6%) is at an all-time low, and it is statistically similar to that in the U.S. (8.8%). Both the New Mexico and U.S. youth cigarette smoking prevalence have met and surpassed the Healthy People 2020 goal of 16.0%.
  7. The use of electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, has recently emerged as a new public health concern. Although scientists are still learning about the long-term effects of e-cigarettes, we do know most contain nicotine, which is highly addictive and can harm adolescent and young adult brain development. The aerosol in e-cigarettes contains nicotine, cancer-causing chemicals, and tiny particles that can reach deep into the lungs. According to the National Academies of Science (2018), there is substantial evidence that e-cigarette use increases risk of ever using combustible tobacco cigarettes among youth and young adults.
  8. As of 2017, e-cigarette use (24.7%) among high school youth in NM has significantly outpaced the use of combustible cigarettes (10.6%). Although there have been significant declines in combustible cigarette use among youth, the emergence of e-cigarettes and the risks for nicotine addiction requires attention both through public health prevention and policy efforts.
  9. NM Quit Now Data link = http://nmtupac.com/data/

 

Smoking in African American Populations

 

 

Ways to Quit

 

 

Tools for Talking to the Smokers in Your Life

 

 

Capacity Building Resources for Organizations